Home ASG News Process Port - Which process is using which ports?
Process Port - Which process is using which ports? PDF Print E-mail
Sunday, 29 June 2008 14:26



Process & Port - Which process is using which port or ports?

Are you trying to figure out what process or process identifier(PID) is using what port? This is easier than you think. (Windows Instructions Only)


First Off - we need to make sure that you can see the Process Identifier in the Task Manager. It is not turned on by default in Windows XP, but we can add it in 1 quick step. Open your task manager, then choose the Processes Tab, then click View at the top of the task manager and choose Select Columns, then put a check in the option for PID (Process Identifier) and choose OK to apply that setting. Now if you look at the Processes tab in the task manager, you should have a new row showing up that is called PID. That is the Process Identifier that we need to find using the instructions below. There are also examples of what your looking to compare at the bottom of this page.


Windows XP Instuctions

  1. Click on Start
  2. Click on Run (if you can find run, open task manager using ctrl, alt, delete, then click file, new task)
  3. Type cmd in the Run box and click OK
  4. Type netstat -a -b
  5. Look for the PID number for each row/connection that shows up
  6. Open Task Manager, choose the processes tab, and look for the PID column, if you dont see the PID column click on view and choose columns and put a check in PID and choose OK. Then the PID column should be showing.
  7. Match the PID to the one you found in the CMD (command prompt) window. The port that the process is using will be shown in the CMD window. A better example is shown below under "Examples of What to Compare"


Windows Vista & Windows 7 Instuctions

  1. Click on Start, or some call it, Windows Vista logo button
  2. Type in cmd into your search box and hit enter on your keyboard (if that fails, open task manager using ctrl, alt, delete, then click file, new task, then type cmd in the Run box and click OK)
  3. Type netstat -a -b
  4. Look at the PID number for each connection that shows up
  5. Open Task Manager, choose the processes tab, and look for the PID column, if you dont see the PID column click on view and choose columns and put a check in PID and choose OK. Then the PID column should be showing.
  6. Match the PID you find in Process Explorer to the one you found in the CMD (command prompt) window. The port that the process is using will be shown in the CMD window. A better example is shown below under "Examples of What to Compare"


Examples of What to Compare
If you ran the netstat -a -b command, you should see a lot of lines like the one shown below. In the example below, the numbers 744 is the PID. If you find the process in Task Manager with that same PID. Then that is the process that is running on local port 9595 and remote port 0
TCP    local-computer-name:9595   other-computer-name:0  LISTENING  744
 
 


Last Updated on Monday, 29 March 2010 14:21
 


Copyright © 2014 ASG - Antihack Security Groups. All Rights Reserved.
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL License.
 

Related Content

Featured Links:
McAfee Site Advisor